A volcanic eruption in Iceland created a volcanic fissure

Aerial footage of a volcano erupting in Iceland on Monday evening.
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  • A volcano erupted in Iceland, spewing lava and smoke from miles-long fissures in the earth.
  • Aerial footage of the explosion was shared by Iceland’s National Police.
  • The eruption’s glow was visible 25 miles away from Iceland’s capital.

A volcano erupted in Iceland on Monday evening, creating miles of fissures and spewing lava and smoke.

Aerial footage of a volcanic eruption on Iceland’s Reykjanes peninsula was captured by the country’s national police and shared on Facebook.

According to Iceland’s Met Office, during the first two hours of the eruption, hundreds of cubic meters of lava were ejected every second by the eruption.
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In the footage, volcanic fountains can be seen erupting from fissures, accompanied by a huge plume of smoke. The eruption lit up the sky and landscape as lava spread across the surrounding landscape.

According to Iceland, the fissure is estimated to be four kilometers long, or about 2.5 miles. Meteorological Office. The southern edge of the rift is less than two miles from the nearest town of Grindavik.

More than 3,000 of the city’s residents were evacuated in November, after a series of earthquakes caused large cracks in the ground and vented steam.

According to the Meteorological Office, it is estimated that hundreds of cubic meters of lava will be released from the eruption in the first two hours.

The distance from the southern edge of the rift to nearby Grindawick is close to two miles.
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The glow of the explosion was visible all the way from Iceland’s capital, Reykjavik – Grindavik, about 25 miles away. Reykjavik GrapevineA local news agency.

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There was also an explosion Filmed via web cameras In Iceland, the incident is being broadcast live to thousands of viewers.

Before the eruption, volcanologists said it was unlikely to match the destructiveness of Iceland’s Eyjafjallaj√∂kull eruption in November, which disrupted air travel in western Europe for weeks.

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